Principles

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Principles

RTENOTITLE

Putting students at the centre of teaching and learning

(aka personalisation)

BACKGROUND THINKING
A teacher’s role may never be neutral but it does seem plausible that ICT’s can make personalised learning easier. In fact identifying individual student needs, placing the learner at the centre and personalising student learning through ICTs is the key idea in the MoE’s new action plan for schools, “Enabling the 21st Century Learner – An e learning action plan 2006 -2010.

However, it is “who identifies the individual’s needs” that is critical, (Fraser 2006).

In education, we often understand personalisation as “institutional provision and procedure”. The kind of personalisation that occurs when individual needs and circumstances are anticipated and then built into provision through e learning environments that track, limit, and control. This is not unlike the regular classroom where after we take the attendance roll we use the ideas in the curriculum documents to determine student-learning experiences.

A second sense of personalisation develops when requests for greater flexibility lead the trade hall vendors to respond with a product customisable by the school, the teacher and sometimes but not often the learner. It is still institutional provision within a “walled garden” but the user can choose between predetermined elements of provision – e.g. to access the forum or the blog to record their questions. This is not unlike the regular classroom when we allow students to use different thinking strategies and tools to think about the ideas in the curriculum documents.

The first two approaches to personalisation through ICT will not readily engage the learner who is already using the rich connectivity of ICTs to learn outside of school. It is a little like letting students who already drive cars on the road to bring their cars to school but to drive only in first gear in the parking lot. These first two approaches to personalisation through ICT do not readily engage teachers, the learning opportunities on offer are not different enough from the approaches they can access without ICT.

According to Fraser’s personalisation framework, the third kind of personalisation through ICTs happens when

The connectivity of ICTs can contribute to this form of student-determined personalisation in a unique way. This personalisation of learning through ICTs is not unlike encouraging student metacognitive reflection on their learning process, so that in time students can determine their own learning needs for “production, reception, and relationships”. (Hook 2007)


Principles and the HOT Differentiated Curriculum Model

The New Zealand Curriculum principles and how they are addressed in the key design elements of the HOT Differentiated Curriculum Model.



Beliefs about the New Zealand Curriculum 
Principles to inform the belief 
Differentiated Curriculum Model Elements designed to achieve the Principles 
Why do we have a curriculum? 
What does that mean? 
How do we achieve this? 
“Young people who will be confident, connected, actively involved, lifelong learners.” (The New Zealand Curriculum p7).

“Principles put students at the centre of teaching and learning, asserting that they should experience a curriculum that engages and challenges them, is forward-looking and inclusive, and affirms New Zealand’s unique identity.” (The New Zealand Curriculum p9). 
Differentiated Curriculum Model and Programme including HOT Concept Library, HOT Language of learning visual maps and HOT student self-assessment rubrics coded against student learning outcomes. 

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Put the learner at the centre of teaching and learning 
Be responsive to the learner by respecting individual abilities and interests.

The individual identifies their learning needs with support from the institution.

Flexible provision where content, process, product and learning environment are supported by the system but determined by the user.

Authentic contexts for learning. Knowledge building for local and community needs.

Differentiating learning experiences against student learning outcomes (SOLO Taxonomy). 

Experience engagement when learning: 
Become actively involved in designing and assessing their learning. 
HOT SOLO coded self-assessment rubrics
HOT SOLO coded integrated planning template.
Knowledge building for local and community needs. 

High expectations: 
Achieve personal excellence.

Experience challenge when learning. 
Recognition of prior learning.
Integrated multilevel achievement objectives from The New Zealand Curriculum.
Learning intentions aligned to achievement objectives.
Cognitively differentiated SOLO coded learning experiences.
HOT SOLO coded self-assessment rubrics. 

Treaty of Waitangi: 
Acquire knowledge of te reo Maori me ona tikanga. 
Concepts, macro and micro.

Authentic contexts aligned to concepts 

Differentiating learning experiences against student learning outcomes (SOLO Taxonomy). 

Cultural diversity: 
Valuing the histories and
traditions of all its people. 
HOT Concept Library

Authentic contexts for learning. Knowledge building for local and community needs. 

Inclusion: 
Ensure that all students’ learning needs are addressed. 
Cognitively differentiated SOLO coded learning experiences.
HOT SOLO coded self-assessment rubrics. 

Learn how to learn:
Being able to answer:
How do I know I am learning?
How do I know how well I am learning?
How do I know what to do next in my learning? 
A common understanding of the learning process based upon differentiated learning outcomes (SOLO Taxonomy) and The New Zealand Curriculum Key Competencies.

A common language of learning aligned to differentiated learning outcomes (SOLO Taxonomy).
Common learning interventions (ICT and Thinking) aligned to differentiated learning outcomes (SOLO Taxonomy).
Common classroom practice aligned to differentiated learning outcomes (SOLO Taxonomy). This includes learning experiences, learning intentions, and assessment for learning.
Inquiry and problem based learning 

Community engagement: 
Connects with wider
lives.

Engaging the support of
their families, whanau, and
communities. 
Authentic contexts for learning. Knowledge building for local and community needs. 

Coherence: 
Master disciplinary knowledge and skills across all learning areas in The New Zealand Curriculum. 
Achievement objectives selected across learning areas and levels in The New Zealand Curriculum.
Learning intentions aligned to achievement objectives.
Driving Question aligned to learning intentions.
Three questions for understanding aligned to differentiated learning outcomes.
Learning experiences aligned to differentiated learning outcomes.
Learning interventions (ICT and Thinking) aligned to differentiated learning experiences. 

Future focus: 
Prepare for living in a rapidly changing world.

Understand complex issues. 
Concepts, macro and micro to explore universals.

Authentic contexts aligned to concepts. Knowledge building for local and community needs. 




Planning, prioritising and review

How are you formalising the principles within your school curriculum?

High Expectations

Treaty of Waitangi

Cultural Diversity

Inclusion

Learning to learn

Community engagement

Coherence

Future focus

Artichoke Blog:

Personalisation and the mixed age merino moving along the race twards the drafting gate

Personalisation as Education's Killer App

HOT symbol (150 x 79).jpg

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